• Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Anchorage Police officer Barry Hetlet checks on an injured man laying at the side of East 15th Terrace. It was unclear if the man was assaulted or had fallen, Hetlet said, but he had injuries to his face. The man, who Hetlet said appeared to be intoxicated, was transported by medics. Anchorage medics say the volume of alcohol-related calls they must respond to leaves them less prepared for emergency situations. This photo is part of a project that explored alcohol’s impact in Alaska. Find more in “State of Intoxication” in the Stories and Essays menu.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Daishon Alex holds a picture of his cousin Citari Townes-Sweatt to attract attention to a car wash on Tudor Road on Sunday, July 7, 2013. The event was a fundraiser for the funeral expenses for Townes-Sweatt’s family. The woman was killed after an accident with a drunk driver.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Betty Sweatt, grandmother of Citari Townes-Sweatt, is comforted at the funeral for Citari Townes-Sweatt at New Hope Baptist Church in Mountain View. Police say Townes-Sweatt was killed in a vehicle accident on June 30, after her vehicle was struck by a driver who had been drinking and ran a red light.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Baritone player Andy Sorensen takes a sip before performing with a polka band. The Nordic Skiing Association of Anchorage hosted the Ski Train, and annual party event for 40 years.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Anchorage Police speak with a man whose face was bloodied on Saturday, August 24, 2013, after the downtown Anchorage bars closed. APD flagged a taxi for the man to get home after the man declined to be seen by medics. Police say the potential for violence is great when bars close.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Anchorage police officer Ryan McNamara breaks up a fight on Saturday, August 3, 2013. “Some of the warm nights you’d see a fight every 10 minutes or so,” said APD Sgt. Mark Rein, who oversaw a recent effort to curb late night violence.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Dozens of friends and family of Gregory Jack gathered at Bean’s Cafe for a memorial service on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. Jack, who was a volunteer at the downtown facility to feed Anchorage homeless people, was found dead outside a warehouse in the area. Jack was resident of Karluk Manor, which provides housing for some of the city’s most vulnerable chronic alcoholics.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    A woman carries another as they leave the downtown Anchorage nightlife district. Police say young women are made vulnerable by alcohol are at risk.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    A sign posted outside the Nayokpuk Store shows disagreement over the upcoming local option vote in Shishmaref, Alaska. Voters in Shishmaref were preparing to decide whether to remove a ban on the importation and sale of alcohol in the village.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Customers of the Board of Trade Saloon finish their drinks and head toward the door near the 3 a.m. closing time. Front Street sees an increase in activity during the season that Permanent Fund Dividend checks are issued to Alaska residents.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Darlene Trigg speaks to a man who is laying in the rocks of Nome’s sea wall at about 1:40 a.m. Trigg was a leader for one of several volunteer Safety Patrol teams who walk the streets and alleys of Nome looking for intoxicated people who might be in a dangerous situation. “Our community has been challenged in the past in the sense that people come to Nome and they get lost,” Trigg said. “We’re just trying to prevent that.”

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    A Barrow man who says he used to bootleg alcohol in the city shows one of his tattoos. Barrow has restrictive laws on the importation and sale of alcohol. The man says he is no longer involved in bootlegging.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    A North Slope Police detective, left, walks a man from the tundra near Barrow toward the town as a patrol officer follows on a snowmachine. The man, who police say had been drinking, was arrested for violating conditions of his bail release on other alcohol-related charges. Police received a report that he had a gun, but he was found unarmed. Borough Police Sgt. Detective Nick Sundai says intercepting bootleg alcohol can mean fewer crimes for police to respond to in the region.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Shanna McPheters, mother of Brooke McPheters, receives a hug after a ceremony to remember her daughter. About 50 people gathered along Abbott Road near 88th Avenue to remember Brooke McPheters and Jordyn Durr. The two 15-year-old girls were struck and killed by a vehicle at that spot in August 2013.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    George McBee spends time with his daughter, Zoie. McBee shares custody with the girl’s mother. McBee says thoughts of Zoie help him stay sober and helped him get through struggles with suicidal thoughts when he served time in jail. “She’s like my little angel. She pulled me up out of the fire, and I thank god for her everyday,” he said.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Larry Berg submits breath samples to an alcohol monitor in his home twice a day as he awaits a court hearing on his fourth DUI charge, he says. Alaska Pretrial Services monitors his compliance.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Heidi Case removes her son, Jacob, from the dinner table after he refuses to take a bath. Because of Jacob’s sensory disorder, he dislikes the feel of water on his face or the touch of a towel on his skin. The disorder is related to the boy’s diagnosis of partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Heidi said she didn’t know she was pregnant years earlier when she took a party cruise and drank frequently. The Cases, who now live in Utah, moved to Alaska to seek psychiatric help for their son. That led to the diagnosis.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Daniel Schooler, 11, is assessed by Kathie Morgan, a speech and language pathologist as part of diagnosis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Most childrenwith a fetal alcohol syndrome disorder will never be diagnosed. “Probably 1 percent of individuals who are walking around the state of Alaska right now who have this disability, 1 percent are getting a diagnosis and the other 99 percent are not,” said Marilyn Pierce-Bulger, a member of the diagnostic team for Anchorage-based Assets Inc.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Jamie Gagnon says she struggled with alcoholism while pregnant. She sought an FASD diagnosis in 2012 to help her care for her daughter. “I did this. I better fix it, to the best of my knowledge,” she said.

  • Helen and Serenity Benson FASD

    Helen Benson’s daughter holds bread with hands she colored with a marker. Helen said the girl was about three years old when she noticed an overnight change in the child’s behavior. “It was like ‘Who are you and what have you done with my kid?’” Helen said. Benson was an alcoholic and drug addict in an abusive relationship when she got pregnant.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Helen Benson takes a moment to herself on her front steps on Wednesday, Dec. 18. Benson had been dealing with behavior challenges in her daughter, Serenity. Benson attributes her daughter’s behavior to her partial fetal alcohol syndrome. “I wish I could say that every time I deal with it, it gets a little easier to deal with,” Benson said. “But every single time I have to deal with one of these episodes it wipes me out. It’s really exhausting.”

  • Hatch household FASD

    Carol Hatch, right, adopted six children who were damaged by alcohol in the womb. All are adults now and two have children of their own, yet all still live at home. They struggle to navigate through adulthood to various degrees. Addictions, learning disabilities and legal trouble are some of the obstacles they face as a family. R.J. Galeshoff, left, is reclusive. Ari Schablein, center is a new mom and a recovering methamphetamine addict. Leah Morgan-Carroll dropped out of her first semester of college. This part of the family waits up late at night for Simone Hope, a recovering meth addict who often disappears. The household is examined in the picture story on the following slides. Photographed on Wednesday, March 26, 2014.

  • Hatch household FASD

    Will Seward shops for salad dressing, accompanied by Beth Drew, his state-funded “direct service provider” from Northbridge, a company that assists people with intellectual disabilities. Will was diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome. Drew presses Will to calculate how many ears of corn he’ll need for the family of eight. In the salad dressing aisle, Will is momentarily overwhelmed by all the choices. Photographed on Tuesday, August 27, 2013.

  • Hatch household FASD

    Kellen Swanson peeks out a window while cleaning First United Methodist Church in Anchorage. Kellen says she confident her Fetal Alcohol Syndrome has limited her career options. “I would probably be doing something besides (being) a domestic engineer at a church.” Photographed on Thursday, March 27, 2014.

  • Hatch household FASD

    Simone Hope talks to a panel of counselors at the Clitheroe treatment center in an attempt to “phase up” to the next level toward completion of the 90-day program. Simone is recovering from methamphetamine addiction.
    Simone tells the counselors she’s ready to make the most of the two months she has left in the program. She steps out of the room so they can talk about her case.
    “She’s also FASD (fetal alcohol spectrum disorders). She’s pretty mild,” counselor Vicky Nelson says, looking around the table. Photographed on Thursday, December 19, 2013.

  • Hatch household FASD

    A notepad in Kellen Swanson’s bedroom lists some of her goals. Kellen has fetal alcohol syndrome. Photographed on Thursday, August 22, 2013.

  • Hatch household FASD

    Will celebrates his 21st birthday with party at Chuck E. Cheese with his family, which has just finished singing “Happy Birthday.” The irony of choosing a kid-oriented arcade as the venue is intentional, Carol says. She wanted to plan something that stood in contrast to the way most people celebrate the day they reach legal drinking age. Will has fetal alcohol syndrome. Photographed on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.

  • Hatch household FASD

    Simone Hope is slow to get out of bed. She says that it has been difficult to remain motivated and focused on her recovery as she nears five months of “clean time.” Though she feels pressure from her family, she says it has helped keep her clean for longer than she might have been otherwise. Simone was diagnosed with static encephalopathy, a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Photographed on Thursday, March 27, 2014.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Partiers toast the arrival of 2014 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage on January 1, 2014.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    sobriety test in the rain after a traffic stop on 4th Avenue. Officer Barry Hetlet is at right. The woman was arrested.

  • Marc Lester, photojournalist, Anchorage, Alaska

    Nome Community Service Officer Carl Putman, left, and Police Officer Justin Timm respond to a woman laying in Front Street. The woman was helped into the Community Service vehicle and transported to a hospital.