• Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Kikkan Randall is photographed with her Olympic gold medal in Anchorage, Alaska, during a homecoming celebration. In the last race of Randall’s five Olympic apperances, she and a teammate won the USA’s first ever gold in cross-country skiing in Pyenongchang. Just as she began her post-racing life, Randall was diagnosed with breast cancer.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Olympic gold medalist Kikkan Randall speaks to a crowd gathered in Anchorage’s Town Square on April 4, 2018. Randall and another Team USA cross-country skier won the USA’s first gold medal ever in the sport in Pyongchang in February. It was the last of five Olympic appearances for Randall, who is the most decorated cross-country skier the US has produced. Just months after she won gold and began her post-racing life, Randall was diagnosed with breast cancer.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    With support from friends, Kikkan Randall tries on wigs at Fashion Wigs in the Northway Mall on July 13, 2018. “That was one of the first real moments where you do recognize what a big change it’s going to be,” she said. From left are Diana Johnson, Nicole DeYong, Kristy DeYong, Rachel Samuelson and Laura Gardner.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Halo Salon stylist Ramona Larson shaves Kikkan Randall’s head after Randall’s hair began to rapidly fall out on July 25, 2018. Larson said the haircut is one of the hardest she is called on to give. “That’s why people come in here, to feel beautiful, and all of a sudden you’re taking all that away,” Larson said.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Kikkan Randall cries after reading a letter of support that was sent to her cancer treatment clinic on August 21, 2018.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Exhausted from traveling and ill from the side effects of chemotherapy, Kikkan Randall sleeps on her sofa in Penticton, B.C., on October 6, 2018. Randall travelled between Penticton and Anchorage for treatment because of her health insurance coverage.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Kikkan Randall works out at an Alaska Club on October 2, 2018. Randall said it was a priority to stay active during the course of her cancer treatment and wanted to be an example to other women in treatment.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Kikkan Randall, left, poses for a photo with Regina Wright on September 29, 2018. “Seeing her gave me courage to not be embarrassed about my bald head,” Wright said.

  • Kikkan Randall, Olympian, breast cancer, cross country skiing

    Kikkan Randall works out at an Alaska Club on October 2, 2018. Randall said it was a priority to stay active during the course of her cancer treatment. (Marc Lester / ADN)

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Kikkan Randall walks with her husband Jeff Ellis, and their two-year-old son Breck, in the hills near their home in Penticton, B.C., on October 9, 2018. The couple had planned to expand their family soon after Randall retired from racing, but cancer called that into question.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Kikkan Randall recovers in the moments after her lumpectomy surgery at Providence Alaska Medical Center on November 8, 2018. Randall would need two surgeries to remove areas of tissue that her surgeon said were a concern. “We’re going to get through the majority of the treatment, but the worry will never totally go away,” Randall said.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    Wearing a party hat her mother brought her, Kikkan Randall hold her son, Breck, during her last full chemotherapy treatment at Katmai Oncology on October 22, 2018. Some chemotherapy will continue until spring 2019.

  • Olympic gold medalist faces cancer

    After a radiation treatment, Kikkan Randall skis a trail in Far North Bicentennial Park in Anchorage on December 12, 2018. Looking back, Randall said her Olympic gold medal was a memory she’ll cherish, but it also seemed fleeting. “Going through something like this so quickly afterwards maybe just puts it into perspective a little bit,” she said. “The gold medal is cool, but it’s not the most important thing in life.”

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